Mi lismoneis

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Ever since antiquity, music transcription has been the intrinsic way of visual representation of sound, sometimes in detail and sometimes in the form of a guide. Throughout time, the visual capture of music has been the only way to store and preserve it over time, but also the exclusive means of reproducing it. In any case, visual transfer should be considered as an auxiliary tool, since oral dissemination and storage in the memory of artists have been the most timeless techniques for the diffusion of music through time and space. During Europe's so-called "classical" musical period, with its most powerful centers of production, such as today's Austria, Germany, France and Italy, and especially in its path towards Romanticism, music transcription, that is, the musical score, was considered by some composers as the very embodiment of their work.

Understandably, in the modern capitalist world, music transcription, as the primary tool for the substantialization of music, brought under its purview repertoires that were not connected, were not disseminated, and did not function on the basis of their transcription. This offered to the music product sales centers an additional tool to expand their action network: non-scholar musics acquired a convenient way of circulating them, enhancing their popularity, even in places very far from those of their original creation. At the end of the 19th century, however, the phenomenon of sound recording and reproduction rearranged relationships and disrupted the status quo of publishing houses, claiming a share of the market, offering a product that was extremely complete and immediate. The publishing houses tried to react with legal measures, but it became impossible to stop the dynamics of the new phenomenon: the prevalence of commercial discography was now a fact, for most of the 20th century.

As far as non-scholar music is concerned, commercial printed musical scores were publications of the musical texts of songs or instrumental pieces (for the publishing activity in Greece see Lerch-Kalavrytinos, 2003: 4-5). For the needs of musical scores, the songs were arranged mainly (but not only) for piano or for piano and voice, generally without complex performance requirements. Multi-instrumental or technically demanding orchestrations were systematically avoided. The lyrics were printed below the notes of the melodic development of the singing parts and, sometimes, their translations into other languages. For the most part, the musical scores were two or four pages long, and came with a themed front and back cover.

Η εν λόγω τετρασέλιδη παρτιτούρα περιέχει το τραγούδι «Μη λησμονείς», σε μουσική του E. Di Capua και στίχους του Δ. Βιτάλη. Πρόκειται για διασκευή του ναπολιτάνικου τραγουδιού "O sole mio", σε μουσική των Eduardo Di Capua και Emanuele Alfredo Mazzucchi και στίχους του Giovanni Capurro.

Το μονόχρωμο εξώφυλλο, επιχρωματισμένο πιθανώς από τον συλλέκτη της παρτιτούρας, κοσμεί σχέδιο άνδρα με χαρακτηριστική αμφίεση εποχής, ο οποίος κρατά κονδυλοφόρο και ένα είδος τετραδίου μεγάλων διαστάσεων, ενώ από τον ώμο του κρέμεται έγχορδο μουσικό όργανο. Αναγράφεται ο τίτλος του τραγουδιού, «Δι' άσμα και κλειδοκύμβαλον», το όνομα του Έλληνα στιχουργού, του συνθέτη, καθώς και ο εκδότης. Φέρει σφραγίδα "Ηλιάδης & Σώμος, Χαρτοπωλείον, Εν Πειραιεί" και υπογραφή του συλλέκτη στην ελληνική και τη γαλλική γλώσσα.

Το μουσικό κείμενο αποτελείται από σύστημα τριών πενταγράμμων (δύο για πιάνο και ένα για φωνή) και συνοδεύεται από τους στίχους στην ελληνική γλώσσα. Στη σελ. 2 φέρει ένδειξη για την τονικότητα, τη φωνητική έκταση και τη ρυθμική αγωγή (Andantino).

Στο κενό οπισθόφυλλο φέρει σκίτσο και υπογραφή του συλλέκτη στη γαλλική γλώσσα.

Για περισσότερα σχετικά με το τραγούδι βλέπε εδώ.

Lyrics by:
[Neapolitan lyrics: Capurro Giovanni]
Greek lyrics: Vitalis D.
Publication location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Opening lyrics:
Mi lismoniseis ki an makria mou eisai
Publisher:
Z. Veloudios, Athens
Publication code:
370
Original property rights:
Veloudios Z.
Handwritten note:
Εξώφυλλο: Υπογραφή του συλλέκτη Ι.Κ. Ζαρπαλά στην ελληνική και τη γαλλική γλώσσα (Jean Zarbalas)
Οπισθόφυλλο: υπογραφή του συλλέκτη στη γαλλική γλώσσα και σκίτσο του ιδίου
Physical description:
Χαρτί, 32,2 Χ 24 εκ., 4 σελίδες, μέτρια κατάσταση, με σκισίματα και επιδιορθώσεις με αυτοκόλλητη διαφανή ταινία
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
202310221357
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Mi lismoneis", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=11282

PDF cannot be displayed, please update.

Ever since antiquity, music transcription has been the intrinsic way of visual representation of sound, sometimes in detail and sometimes in the form of a guide. Throughout time, the visual capture of music has been the only way to store and preserve it over time, but also the exclusive means of reproducing it. In any case, visual transfer should be considered as an auxiliary tool, since oral dissemination and storage in the memory of artists have been the most timeless techniques for the diffusion of music through time and space. During Europe's so-called "classical" musical period, with its most powerful centers of production, such as today's Austria, Germany, France and Italy, and especially in its path towards Romanticism, music transcription, that is, the musical score, was considered by some composers as the very embodiment of their work.

Understandably, in the modern capitalist world, music transcription, as the primary tool for the substantialization of music, brought under its purview repertoires that were not connected, were not disseminated, and did not function on the basis of their transcription. This offered to the music product sales centers an additional tool to expand their action network: non-scholar musics acquired a convenient way of circulating them, enhancing their popularity, even in places very far from those of their original creation. At the end of the 19th century, however, the phenomenon of sound recording and reproduction rearranged relationships and disrupted the status quo of publishing houses, claiming a share of the market, offering a product that was extremely complete and immediate. The publishing houses tried to react with legal measures, but it became impossible to stop the dynamics of the new phenomenon: the prevalence of commercial discography was now a fact, for most of the 20th century.

As far as non-scholar music is concerned, commercial printed musical scores were publications of the musical texts of songs or instrumental pieces (for the publishing activity in Greece see Lerch-Kalavrytinos, 2003: 4-5). For the needs of musical scores, the songs were arranged mainly (but not only) for piano or for piano and voice, generally without complex performance requirements. Multi-instrumental or technically demanding orchestrations were systematically avoided. The lyrics were printed below the notes of the melodic development of the singing parts and, sometimes, their translations into other languages. For the most part, the musical scores were two or four pages long, and came with a themed front and back cover.

Η εν λόγω τετρασέλιδη παρτιτούρα περιέχει το τραγούδι «Μη λησμονείς», σε μουσική του E. Di Capua και στίχους του Δ. Βιτάλη. Πρόκειται για διασκευή του ναπολιτάνικου τραγουδιού "O sole mio", σε μουσική των Eduardo Di Capua και Emanuele Alfredo Mazzucchi και στίχους του Giovanni Capurro.

Το μονόχρωμο εξώφυλλο, επιχρωματισμένο πιθανώς από τον συλλέκτη της παρτιτούρας, κοσμεί σχέδιο άνδρα με χαρακτηριστική αμφίεση εποχής, ο οποίος κρατά κονδυλοφόρο και ένα είδος τετραδίου μεγάλων διαστάσεων, ενώ από τον ώμο του κρέμεται έγχορδο μουσικό όργανο. Αναγράφεται ο τίτλος του τραγουδιού, «Δι' άσμα και κλειδοκύμβαλον», το όνομα του Έλληνα στιχουργού, του συνθέτη, καθώς και ο εκδότης. Φέρει σφραγίδα "Ηλιάδης & Σώμος, Χαρτοπωλείον, Εν Πειραιεί" και υπογραφή του συλλέκτη στην ελληνική και τη γαλλική γλώσσα.

Το μουσικό κείμενο αποτελείται από σύστημα τριών πενταγράμμων (δύο για πιάνο και ένα για φωνή) και συνοδεύεται από τους στίχους στην ελληνική γλώσσα. Στη σελ. 2 φέρει ένδειξη για την τονικότητα, τη φωνητική έκταση και τη ρυθμική αγωγή (Andantino).

Στο κενό οπισθόφυλλο φέρει σκίτσο και υπογραφή του συλλέκτη στη γαλλική γλώσσα.

Για περισσότερα σχετικά με το τραγούδι βλέπε εδώ.

Lyrics by:
[Neapolitan lyrics: Capurro Giovanni]
Greek lyrics: Vitalis D.
Publication location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Opening lyrics:
Mi lismoniseis ki an makria mou eisai
Publisher:
Z. Veloudios, Athens
Publication code:
370
Original property rights:
Veloudios Z.
Handwritten note:
Εξώφυλλο: Υπογραφή του συλλέκτη Ι.Κ. Ζαρπαλά στην ελληνική και τη γαλλική γλώσσα (Jean Zarbalas)
Οπισθόφυλλο: υπογραφή του συλλέκτη στη γαλλική γλώσσα και σκίτσο του ιδίου
Physical description:
Χαρτί, 32,2 Χ 24 εκ., 4 σελίδες, μέτρια κατάσταση, με σκισίματα και επιδιορθώσεις με αυτοκόλλητη διαφανή ταινία
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
202310221357
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Mi lismoneis", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=11282

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