Valentsia

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At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The network in which the Greek-speaking urban popular song participates, constantly conversing with its co-tenants, is magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

One of these fascinating networks concerns the Spanish world, which, through a variety of paths, meets the Greek one. A key chapter in this influence was the unparalleled international success achieved by a Spanish estudiantina in 1878 in Paris. Following its success, the band toured countless locations around the world. According to the sources, on February 28, 1886, the Spanish estudiantina gave a concert in Constantinople (Istanbul) and on April 26 and 29, 1886, in Athens (for the first Greek estudiantina, see Ordoulidis, 2021a: 88–100 and Ordoulidis, 2021b). The Spanish students mainstream the culture of semi-professional music bands, the culture of the banduria, the mandolin, the guitar, the “tuna”, that is, the street serenades, and the habanera. The latter follows a path that starts from the Afro-Cuban repertoires and ends up being appropriated by Greek musicians, finding its place even in the form of the manes (see, for example, the Smyrneiko minore (Smyrnaean minor), Gramophone 12574b). The network of the theater is a key environment for the circulation of music; and the relationship between the two (music-theater) is more than dynamic. The appropriation by Greek musicians is twofold: on the one hand are the lyrics, which are now in Greek (often, in fact, they have nothing to do with the original ones), and, on the other hand, the performance practices: different instrumentation, different singing style, often differences in melodic and rhythmic forms and in the harmonies. Greek musicians adapt what they hear to their own condition, based on their own capabilities. In 1894, when the play of the then most popular zarzuela “La Gran Vía” was played for the first time, a new path that led to the appearance of the Athenian revue opened. Spanish songs started being adapted into Greek since then. These songs arrived at the Greek-speaking world either directly or indirectly, through other repertoire networks. In any case, the circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography was not only embedded in this context, but played a key role in its transformation.
In various cases, often due to the great international success of the songs, the resulting network is extremely complex, and contains recordings in countless places, languages and aesthetical frameworks. One such case is the song "Valentsia".

It is an adaptation of the Spanish pasodoble "Valencia" with Greek lyrics, which comes from the two-act zarzuela "La bien amada", set to music by José Padilla and libretto by José Andrés de Prada. The zarzuela premiered on October 15, 1924 at the Tívoli Theater in Barcelona.

The song was included in the French revue "Mistinguett" presented at the Moulin-Rouge in 1925, as well as in the Polish revue "Pod sukienką" which was staged in 1926 at the Perskie Oko theater in Warsaw.

It was an international success and has been recorded in historical discography countless times in various formats, languages and locations, selling more than 22 million copies (for recordings and re-releases in the USA see here). For example:

- Mercedes Serós, Barcelona, May 25, 1925 (Gramophone BS 1942 - AE 1340/2-263476)
- Mistinguett, Paris, 1925 (Pathé 200245 - 4252, X 4010)
- Carlos Gardel, Argentina, 1926 (Disco National Odeon 3927 - 18167 A)
- Zula Pogorzelska, Warsaw, 1926 (Syrena-Grand-Record 17825 - 17825)
- Jazz Band Kosarin, Rio de Janeiro, 1926 (Odeon R 123078)
- Savoy Havana Band - Cyril Ramon Newton, London, February 16, 1926 (HMV Bb 7903 II - X 2332/4-332)
- Εdwardo Sadero (Edwart Leer), London, April 15, 1926 (HMV Bb 8258  - R 46597/52333)
- "Saveria", Eduardo Migliaccio, New York, December 1, 1926 (Victor BVE 37060 - 79107)
- Saxophon Orchester Dobbri, Berlin, 1926 (Beka 33218 - B. 5417-I)
- Jesse Crawford, New York,  December 1, 1926 (Victor BVE-37060 - 79107)
- Hans Schwarz, Germany, 1927 (Schallplatte "Grammophon" B 42351 20504)

The song also made it into the cinema in the 1926 American film of the same name, while references to it can also be found in literature such as in "Der Steppenwolf" (1927) by the German-Swiss Herman Hesse, in "La invención de Morel" (1940) by the Argentine writer Adolfo Bioy Casares, in "Hitlers Nichte des Kölner" (2002) by Heinz-Dieter Herbig and others.

In Greek historical discography, the song was also recorded by Giorgos Vidalis and Tetos Dimitriadis.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[Spanish lyrics: de Prada José Andrés] Greek lyrics: Unknown
Singer(s):
Delendas Antonis
Orchestra-Performers:
Orchestra
Orchestra director:
Martino Angelos
Recording date:
1927
Recording location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Dance / Rhythm:
Charleston
Publisher:
Polydor
Catalogue number:
V 45149
Matrix number:
4649¾ ar
Duration:
2:55
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Polydor_45149_Valencia
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Valentsia", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=5365

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The network in which the Greek-speaking urban popular song participates, constantly conversing with its co-tenants, is magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

One of these fascinating networks concerns the Spanish world, which, through a variety of paths, meets the Greek one. A key chapter in this influence was the unparalleled international success achieved by a Spanish estudiantina in 1878 in Paris. Following its success, the band toured countless locations around the world. According to the sources, on February 28, 1886, the Spanish estudiantina gave a concert in Constantinople (Istanbul) and on April 26 and 29, 1886, in Athens (for the first Greek estudiantina, see Ordoulidis, 2021a: 88–100 and Ordoulidis, 2021b). The Spanish students mainstream the culture of semi-professional music bands, the culture of the banduria, the mandolin, the guitar, the “tuna”, that is, the street serenades, and the habanera. The latter follows a path that starts from the Afro-Cuban repertoires and ends up being appropriated by Greek musicians, finding its place even in the form of the manes (see, for example, the Smyrneiko minore (Smyrnaean minor), Gramophone 12574b). The network of the theater is a key environment for the circulation of music; and the relationship between the two (music-theater) is more than dynamic. The appropriation by Greek musicians is twofold: on the one hand are the lyrics, which are now in Greek (often, in fact, they have nothing to do with the original ones), and, on the other hand, the performance practices: different instrumentation, different singing style, often differences in melodic and rhythmic forms and in the harmonies. Greek musicians adapt what they hear to their own condition, based on their own capabilities. In 1894, when the play of the then most popular zarzuela “La Gran Vía” was played for the first time, a new path that led to the appearance of the Athenian revue opened. Spanish songs started being adapted into Greek since then. These songs arrived at the Greek-speaking world either directly or indirectly, through other repertoire networks. In any case, the circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography was not only embedded in this context, but played a key role in its transformation.
In various cases, often due to the great international success of the songs, the resulting network is extremely complex, and contains recordings in countless places, languages and aesthetical frameworks. One such case is the song "Valentsia".

It is an adaptation of the Spanish pasodoble "Valencia" with Greek lyrics, which comes from the two-act zarzuela "La bien amada", set to music by José Padilla and libretto by José Andrés de Prada. The zarzuela premiered on October 15, 1924 at the Tívoli Theater in Barcelona.

The song was included in the French revue "Mistinguett" presented at the Moulin-Rouge in 1925, as well as in the Polish revue "Pod sukienką" which was staged in 1926 at the Perskie Oko theater in Warsaw.

It was an international success and has been recorded in historical discography countless times in various formats, languages and locations, selling more than 22 million copies (for recordings and re-releases in the USA see here). For example:

- Mercedes Serós, Barcelona, May 25, 1925 (Gramophone BS 1942 - AE 1340/2-263476)
- Mistinguett, Paris, 1925 (Pathé 200245 - 4252, X 4010)
- Carlos Gardel, Argentina, 1926 (Disco National Odeon 3927 - 18167 A)
- Zula Pogorzelska, Warsaw, 1926 (Syrena-Grand-Record 17825 - 17825)
- Jazz Band Kosarin, Rio de Janeiro, 1926 (Odeon R 123078)
- Savoy Havana Band - Cyril Ramon Newton, London, February 16, 1926 (HMV Bb 7903 II - X 2332/4-332)
- Εdwardo Sadero (Edwart Leer), London, April 15, 1926 (HMV Bb 8258  - R 46597/52333)
- "Saveria", Eduardo Migliaccio, New York, December 1, 1926 (Victor BVE 37060 - 79107)
- Saxophon Orchester Dobbri, Berlin, 1926 (Beka 33218 - B. 5417-I)
- Jesse Crawford, New York,  December 1, 1926 (Victor BVE-37060 - 79107)
- Hans Schwarz, Germany, 1927 (Schallplatte "Grammophon" B 42351 20504)

The song also made it into the cinema in the 1926 American film of the same name, while references to it can also be found in literature such as in "Der Steppenwolf" (1927) by the German-Swiss Herman Hesse, in "La invención de Morel" (1940) by the Argentine writer Adolfo Bioy Casares, in "Hitlers Nichte des Kölner" (2002) by Heinz-Dieter Herbig and others.

In Greek historical discography, the song was also recorded by Giorgos Vidalis and Tetos Dimitriadis.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[Spanish lyrics: de Prada José Andrés] Greek lyrics: Unknown
Singer(s):
Delendas Antonis
Orchestra-Performers:
Orchestra
Orchestra director:
Martino Angelos
Recording date:
1927
Recording location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Dance / Rhythm:
Charleston
Publisher:
Polydor
Catalogue number:
V 45149
Matrix number:
4649¾ ar
Duration:
2:55
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Polydor_45149_Valencia
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Valentsia", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=5365

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See also