Konstantinoupoli

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At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

This recording is an adaptation with Greek lyrics by F. Bakalis of the English song "C-o-n-s-t-a-n-t-i-n-o-p-l-e", with music and lyrics by the British Harry Carlton.

The musical score was published in 1928, in London, by the Lawrence Right Music Co. Ltd. It was also released in the USA (see here) as well as in France (see here).

The song soon became a global hit, and has been recorded times in historical discography, in various forms, languages and locations. For example:

– "C-o-n-s-t-a-n-t-i-n-o-p-l-e", Six Jumping Jacks - Tom Stacks, New York, May 16, 1928 (Brunswick 3940 – E27559)
– "C-o-n-s-t-a-n-t-i-n-o-p-l-e", Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra, New York, May 17, 1928 (Columbia W 146291 – 4951)
– "C.o.n.s.t.a.n.t.i.n.o.p.l.e", Jack Hylton and his Orchestra, London, June 21, 1928 (HMV Bb 13567-1 – B 5501)
– "Constantinople", Tanz-Orchestre Dajos Béla, Berlin, August 16, 1928 (Odeon Be-6998-2 – O-2548)
– "C.o.n.s.t.a.n.t.i.n.o.p.l.e", M. Alibert, Paris, November 1928 (Pathé N. 201374 – X. 3647)
– "C.o.n.s.t.a.n.t.i.n.o.p.l.e", Bidgood's Broadcasters – Harry Fay, London, 1928 (Broadcast – Z. 401 – 227 A)
– "Konstantinopel", Kees Pruis, Berlin, 1928 (Homocord 4-5971)
– "Constantinople", Leslie Sarony, London, 1928 (Edison Bell Radio 88083 – 837)
– "C-o-n-s-t-a-n-t-i-n-o-p-l-a", Juan Pulido, New York, January 31, 1929 (Victor BVE-49903 – 46105)

As Stathis Gauntlett points out (Gauntlett, 2003: 32), this recording was also released by His Master's Voice Australia under the number EB54 and is included in the Australian record catalog published by the company in 1934.

The Greek musical score was published in 1928, in Athens, by the Gaitanos - Konstantinidis - Starr publishing house (see here και here). Also, musical score with English and French lyrics was released in Greece by the magazine "Eros" (see here).

There was no previous management model in the early period of discography (late 19th - early 20th c.). Each company creates their own networks, something that will allow them to take a dynamic lead in the market. New specialties and professions are created and new conditions emerge, or the need to update older facts, with the most serious being intellectual property. The latter, until then, concerned mostly printed commercial musical scores and the publishers’ rights. New small companies are constantly springing up, trying to claim a share of the market, which, sooner or later, takes on global dimensions. They are often bought by larger companies, along with their already recorded repertoires and their existing agreements with agents, producers and musicians. Sooner or later, most of the smaller labels are under the control of a few growing companies. Over the years, and as the recording market becomes more complex, factories-branches are built on all continents. These offices are taken over by local actors who gradually draw up their own policies: they know their markets better. The ever-evolving recording industry proves to be centripetal: the decisions that are taken follow the policies centrally dictated by the managements of the companies and their subsidiaries. This entire environment, this entire layered landscape, becomes even more complex in America. There, “national” repertoires live a new, parallel life. This situation is not static and, to a large extent, is molded by discography, which attends to and “tunes” the overlapping relationships that have already developed in the “Old World”. Repertoires communicate with each other once again; a familiar and already dynamic condition in Europe. The circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation. This time, the network is adjusted in a programmatic manner, under new terms and via new paths.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[English lyrics: Carlton Harry]
Greek lyrics: Bakalis F.
Singer(s):
Dimitriadis Tetos
Orchestra-Performers:
Orchestra [3 violins, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, saxophone, 2 trumpets, trombone, tuba, piano, percussion]
Orchestra director:
Joy Leonard, Shilkret Nathaniel
Recording date:
29/6/1928
Recording location:
New York
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Victor
Catalogue number:
7-59033-B
Matrix number:
CVE 45667
Duration:
3:59
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
12 in. (30 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Vi_59033_Konstantinoupoli
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Konstantinoupoli", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=4230

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

This recording is an adaptation with Greek lyrics by F. Bakalis of the English song "C-o-n-s-t-a-n-t-i-n-o-p-l-e", with music and lyrics by the British Harry Carlton.

The musical score was published in 1928, in London, by the Lawrence Right Music Co. Ltd. It was also released in the USA (see here) as well as in France (see here).

The song soon became a global hit, and has been recorded times in historical discography, in various forms, languages and locations. For example:

– "C-o-n-s-t-a-n-t-i-n-o-p-l-e", Six Jumping Jacks - Tom Stacks, New York, May 16, 1928 (Brunswick 3940 – E27559)
– "C-o-n-s-t-a-n-t-i-n-o-p-l-e", Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra, New York, May 17, 1928 (Columbia W 146291 – 4951)
– "C.o.n.s.t.a.n.t.i.n.o.p.l.e", Jack Hylton and his Orchestra, London, June 21, 1928 (HMV Bb 13567-1 – B 5501)
– "Constantinople", Tanz-Orchestre Dajos Béla, Berlin, August 16, 1928 (Odeon Be-6998-2 – O-2548)
– "C.o.n.s.t.a.n.t.i.n.o.p.l.e", M. Alibert, Paris, November 1928 (Pathé N. 201374 – X. 3647)
– "C.o.n.s.t.a.n.t.i.n.o.p.l.e", Bidgood's Broadcasters – Harry Fay, London, 1928 (Broadcast – Z. 401 – 227 A)
– "Konstantinopel", Kees Pruis, Berlin, 1928 (Homocord 4-5971)
– "Constantinople", Leslie Sarony, London, 1928 (Edison Bell Radio 88083 – 837)
– "C-o-n-s-t-a-n-t-i-n-o-p-l-a", Juan Pulido, New York, January 31, 1929 (Victor BVE-49903 – 46105)

As Stathis Gauntlett points out (Gauntlett, 2003: 32), this recording was also released by His Master's Voice Australia under the number EB54 and is included in the Australian record catalog published by the company in 1934.

The Greek musical score was published in 1928, in Athens, by the Gaitanos - Konstantinidis - Starr publishing house (see here και here). Also, musical score with English and French lyrics was released in Greece by the magazine "Eros" (see here).

There was no previous management model in the early period of discography (late 19th - early 20th c.). Each company creates their own networks, something that will allow them to take a dynamic lead in the market. New specialties and professions are created and new conditions emerge, or the need to update older facts, with the most serious being intellectual property. The latter, until then, concerned mostly printed commercial musical scores and the publishers’ rights. New small companies are constantly springing up, trying to claim a share of the market, which, sooner or later, takes on global dimensions. They are often bought by larger companies, along with their already recorded repertoires and their existing agreements with agents, producers and musicians. Sooner or later, most of the smaller labels are under the control of a few growing companies. Over the years, and as the recording market becomes more complex, factories-branches are built on all continents. These offices are taken over by local actors who gradually draw up their own policies: they know their markets better. The ever-evolving recording industry proves to be centripetal: the decisions that are taken follow the policies centrally dictated by the managements of the companies and their subsidiaries. This entire environment, this entire layered landscape, becomes even more complex in America. There, “national” repertoires live a new, parallel life. This situation is not static and, to a large extent, is molded by discography, which attends to and “tunes” the overlapping relationships that have already developed in the “Old World”. Repertoires communicate with each other once again; a familiar and already dynamic condition in Europe. The circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation. This time, the network is adjusted in a programmatic manner, under new terms and via new paths.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[English lyrics: Carlton Harry]
Greek lyrics: Bakalis F.
Singer(s):
Dimitriadis Tetos
Orchestra-Performers:
Orchestra [3 violins, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, saxophone, 2 trumpets, trombone, tuba, piano, percussion]
Orchestra director:
Joy Leonard, Shilkret Nathaniel
Recording date:
29/6/1928
Recording location:
New York
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Victor
Catalogue number:
7-59033-B
Matrix number:
CVE 45667
Duration:
3:59
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
12 in. (30 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Vi_59033_Konstantinoupoli
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Konstantinoupoli", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=4230

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