Ay - Ay - Ay

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There was no previous management model in the early period of discography. Each company creates their own networks, something that will allow them to take a dynamic lead in the market. New specialties and professions are created and new data emerge, or the need to update older data, with the most serious being intellectual property. The latter, until then, concerned mostly printed commercial music scores and the publishers’ rights. New small companies are constantly springing up, trying to claim a share of the market, which, sooner or later, takes on global dimensions. They are often bought by larger companies, along with their already recorded repertoires and their existing agreements with agents, producers and musicians. Sooner or later, most of the smaller labels are under the control of a few growing companies. Over the years, and as the recording market becomes more complex, factories-branches are built on all continents. These offices are taken over by local actors who gradually draw up their own policies: they know their markets better. The ever-evolving recording industry proves to be centripetal: the decisions that are taken follow the policies centrally dictated by the managements of the companies and their subsidiaries. This entire environment, this entire layered landscape, becomes even more complex in America. There, “national” repertoires live a new, parallel life. This situation is not static and, to a large extent, is molded by discography, which attends to and “tunes” the overlapping relationships that have already developed in the “Old World”. Repertoires communicate with each other once again; a familiar and already dynamic condition in Europe. The circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation. This time, the network is adjusted in a programmatic manner, under new terms and via new paths.

It is an adaptation with Greek lyrics of the song "Ay, Ay, Ay!", set to music by the Chilean composer Osmán Pérez Freire (Santiago, 1878 - Madrid, April 28, 1930).

It is thought to have been first published on a musical score in 1913 by Breyer Hermanos in Buenos Aires. A Chilean musical score was published by the Casa Amarilla publishing house in Santiago, probably around 1928.

The song became a global hit and was recorded countless times in various formats, locations and languages (see here, here and here). For example:

- Agustín Barrios Mangoré, Buenos Aires, 1914 (Atlanta 65376 - 304)
- Ludovico Muzzio, Santiago, June 19, 1917 (Victor G-2065 - 72862)
- Dúo Gardel-Razzano, Argentina, 1918 or 1919 (Disco Gardel-Razzan 18013a)
-Nicola Fusati, Zagreb, August 1926 (Edison Bell Penkala 10054 - 1176)
- Roberto D'Alessio, Milan, 1926 or 1927 (Columbia WB 1148 - D1575)
- "Ај, ај, ај", Власта Јованчић, Germany, 1928 (Polydor 996 bf - L 30253)
- Miguel Fleta, Barcelona, December 9, 1930 (HMV CN 1123 D.B. 1483/32-2016)
- Ivan Horak-Gorski, Berlin, October-November 1928 (Odeon, VSE 1336 - A192809b)
- Emil Svartström, Berlin, 1930 (Tri-Ergon TE 5791-B - 03164-m2)
- Mesquitinha, Rio de Janeiro, November 9, 1931 (Victor 65277-1 - 33496 a)
- Polscy Revellersi, Warsaw, 1931 (Columbia WJ. 201 - DM. 1493 b.)
- Raquel Meller, Paris, 1931 (Odeon KI 5032 - 188.854)
- Ninoun Vallin, Paris, May 31, 1933 (Odeon KI 6067 - 166.669)
- Børge Christiansen, Denmark, 1933 (Polyphon 5170 BR - X.S 50222-B)
- Jaroslav Jaroš, Prague, November 2, 1934 (Ultraphon 40206 - A 10949)
- Jussi Björling, Stockholm, 1936 (HMV OSB411 - X.4723)
- Herbert Ernst Groh, Berlin, December 12, 1940 (Odeon Be 12777 - O 26 439 a)
- Olga Coelho, USA, 1947 (RCA Victor 26-9020A 2S - 26-9020-A)

In Greek historical discography, the song was also recorded, in 1929, in Berlin, by Lysandros Ioannidis and Dajos Béla's orchestra (Parlophone Go 1241 - GZA 2504/ZA 190804 a).

The Greek musical score of the song was published in Athens by the Gaitanos - Konstantinidis - Starr publishing house.

This recording probably took place in Milan, given that, according to the extremely interesting report compiled by Edmund Michael Innes from the trip he made to Greece in April-May 1930 as an emissary of the British record label His Master's Voice for the purpose of collecting and recording information about the company's situation in Greece (also) in relation to the other record labels that were active in the area, Columbia used to send to Milan one of its tenors, [Michalis] Thomakos (Tomako), almost every two months in order to record its latest Western "hits".

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
Greek lyrics: Unknown
Singer(s):
Thomakos Michalis
Orchestra-Performers:
Large orchestra
Recording date:
17/02/1930
Recording location:
Milan (?)
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Columbia (Greece)
Catalogue number:
DG 9
Matrix number:
WG 11
Duration:
3:12
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Col_DG9_AiAiAi
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Ay - Ay - Ay", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=9739

There was no previous management model in the early period of discography. Each company creates their own networks, something that will allow them to take a dynamic lead in the market. New specialties and professions are created and new data emerge, or the need to update older data, with the most serious being intellectual property. The latter, until then, concerned mostly printed commercial music scores and the publishers’ rights. New small companies are constantly springing up, trying to claim a share of the market, which, sooner or later, takes on global dimensions. They are often bought by larger companies, along with their already recorded repertoires and their existing agreements with agents, producers and musicians. Sooner or later, most of the smaller labels are under the control of a few growing companies. Over the years, and as the recording market becomes more complex, factories-branches are built on all continents. These offices are taken over by local actors who gradually draw up their own policies: they know their markets better. The ever-evolving recording industry proves to be centripetal: the decisions that are taken follow the policies centrally dictated by the managements of the companies and their subsidiaries. This entire environment, this entire layered landscape, becomes even more complex in America. There, “national” repertoires live a new, parallel life. This situation is not static and, to a large extent, is molded by discography, which attends to and “tunes” the overlapping relationships that have already developed in the “Old World”. Repertoires communicate with each other once again; a familiar and already dynamic condition in Europe. The circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation. This time, the network is adjusted in a programmatic manner, under new terms and via new paths.

It is an adaptation with Greek lyrics of the song "Ay, Ay, Ay!", set to music by the Chilean composer Osmán Pérez Freire (Santiago, 1878 - Madrid, April 28, 1930).

It is thought to have been first published on a musical score in 1913 by Breyer Hermanos in Buenos Aires. A Chilean musical score was published by the Casa Amarilla publishing house in Santiago, probably around 1928.

The song became a global hit and was recorded countless times in various formats, locations and languages (see here, here and here). For example:

- Agustín Barrios Mangoré, Buenos Aires, 1914 (Atlanta 65376 - 304)
- Ludovico Muzzio, Santiago, June 19, 1917 (Victor G-2065 - 72862)
- Dúo Gardel-Razzano, Argentina, 1918 or 1919 (Disco Gardel-Razzan 18013a)
-Nicola Fusati, Zagreb, August 1926 (Edison Bell Penkala 10054 - 1176)
- Roberto D'Alessio, Milan, 1926 or 1927 (Columbia WB 1148 - D1575)
- "Ај, ај, ај", Власта Јованчић, Germany, 1928 (Polydor 996 bf - L 30253)
- Miguel Fleta, Barcelona, December 9, 1930 (HMV CN 1123 D.B. 1483/32-2016)
- Ivan Horak-Gorski, Berlin, October-November 1928 (Odeon, VSE 1336 - A192809b)
- Emil Svartström, Berlin, 1930 (Tri-Ergon TE 5791-B - 03164-m2)
- Mesquitinha, Rio de Janeiro, November 9, 1931 (Victor 65277-1 - 33496 a)
- Polscy Revellersi, Warsaw, 1931 (Columbia WJ. 201 - DM. 1493 b.)
- Raquel Meller, Paris, 1931 (Odeon KI 5032 - 188.854)
- Ninoun Vallin, Paris, May 31, 1933 (Odeon KI 6067 - 166.669)
- Børge Christiansen, Denmark, 1933 (Polyphon 5170 BR - X.S 50222-B)
- Jaroslav Jaroš, Prague, November 2, 1934 (Ultraphon 40206 - A 10949)
- Jussi Björling, Stockholm, 1936 (HMV OSB411 - X.4723)
- Herbert Ernst Groh, Berlin, December 12, 1940 (Odeon Be 12777 - O 26 439 a)
- Olga Coelho, USA, 1947 (RCA Victor 26-9020A 2S - 26-9020-A)

In Greek historical discography, the song was also recorded, in 1929, in Berlin, by Lysandros Ioannidis and Dajos Béla's orchestra (Parlophone Go 1241 - GZA 2504/ZA 190804 a).

The Greek musical score of the song was published in Athens by the Gaitanos - Konstantinidis - Starr publishing house.

This recording probably took place in Milan, given that, according to the extremely interesting report compiled by Edmund Michael Innes from the trip he made to Greece in April-May 1930 as an emissary of the British record label His Master's Voice for the purpose of collecting and recording information about the company's situation in Greece (also) in relation to the other record labels that were active in the area, Columbia used to send to Milan one of its tenors, [Michalis] Thomakos (Tomako), almost every two months in order to record its latest Western "hits".

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
Greek lyrics: Unknown
Singer(s):
Thomakos Michalis
Orchestra-Performers:
Large orchestra
Recording date:
17/02/1930
Recording location:
Milan (?)
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Columbia (Greece)
Catalogue number:
DG 9
Matrix number:
WG 11
Duration:
3:12
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Col_DG9_AiAiAi
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Ay - Ay - Ay", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=9739

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See also