Par' tin kardia mou

Part of the content is temporarily available only in Greek

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The network in which the Greek-speaking urban popular song participates, constantly conversing with its co-tenants, is magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

One of these fascinating networks concerns French songs, which were appropriated by Greek musicians, among others. The appropriation is twofold: on the one hand are the lyrics, which are now in Greek (often, in fact, they have nothing to do with the original ones), and, on the other hand, the performance practices: different instrumentation, different singing style, often differences in melodic and rhythmic forms and in the harmonies. Greek musicians adapt what they heard to their own condition, based on their own capabilities. The French ecumene lends its chansons, which carry a dynamic tradition of songwriting and performance. Paris, Montmartre and the cabarets artistiques influence the music of the world. The atmosphere from the Chat Noir, which had been operating since 1881, also reaches the Greek world. Music venues of this type, the famous “cafés chantants”, appeared in Athens but also in other urban centers of the Greek state. These French songs were exported to the Greek-speaking world either directly or indirectly, through other repertoire networks. In any case, the circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation. It should also be noted that, in various cases, often due to the great international success of the songs, the resulting network is extremely complex and does not only concern Greek-French relations. Finally, we have time and time again stumbled upon songs whose creators were born in a different place, worked in another, and, in the end, met in a third location and created a new work, often inspired by something pre-existing. Undoubtedly, cases of this type demonstrate the complexity regarding the issues of ownership of works, but also the problem of applying national signs to musical creations.

This recording is an adaptation of the French song "Prends mon coeur", set to music by composer and publisher Félix Marafioti (Varanodio, Italy, December 20, 1881 - Marseille, March 22, 1935) and lyrics by Jean Romani.

The French score was published in Marseilles, in 1927, by F. Marafioti. According to the abovementioned source, the song was introduced by Jane Bruyére at the Mondial.

Two recordings have been found so far in French discography:

- Germaine Lix, France, December 8, 1928 (Pathé Saphir 201445 - 3661 A)
- Gardoni (accordion), Puig (banjo), Baiz (flute), France, between August 1925 - September 1930 (Pathé Saphir 9712 B)

According to the findings so far, the song was recorded twice in Greek historical discography:

- "Par' tin kardia mou", Giorgos Savaris, Tzon Miliaris, Lousien [Loukianos Miliaris], probably in Milan, 1927 (Columbia UK 20228 - 8072), present recording
- "Pare oli tin kardia mou", Athinaiki Estudiantina (Athenian Estudiantina), probably in Athens, 1928 (Homocord G 832 - G 4-32049)

The Greek musical score of the song, with lyrics by Emilios Dragatsis and under the title "S' agapo, pare tin kardia mou", was published in Athens in 1927 by the Gaitanos - Konstantinidis - Starr publishing house.

The label of the record reads "Ekdotis Gaitanos" ("Publisher Gaitanos"), which perhaps testifies to the complex relations that arose between the previously powerful music publishing houses and record labels. It is probable that the publishing houses, which perhaps were among the few entities with recognized copyrights on musical works, would receive part of the recording rights in this new context of the recording industry.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[French lyrics: Romani Jean Greek lyrics: Dragatsis Aimilios]
Singer(s):
Savaris Giorgos, Miliaris Tzon, Lousien [Miliaris Loukianos]
Orchestra-Performers:
Orchestra
Orchestra director:
Lanzetta Ed.
Recording date:
1927
Recording location:
Milan (?)
Language(s):
Greek
Dance / Rhythm:
Blues
Publisher:
Columbia (UK)
Catalogue number:
8072
Matrix number:
20228
Duration:
2:28
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Col_8072_ParTinKardiaMou
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Par' tin kardia mou", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=9517

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The network in which the Greek-speaking urban popular song participates, constantly conversing with its co-tenants, is magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

One of these fascinating networks concerns French songs, which were appropriated by Greek musicians, among others. The appropriation is twofold: on the one hand are the lyrics, which are now in Greek (often, in fact, they have nothing to do with the original ones), and, on the other hand, the performance practices: different instrumentation, different singing style, often differences in melodic and rhythmic forms and in the harmonies. Greek musicians adapt what they heard to their own condition, based on their own capabilities. The French ecumene lends its chansons, which carry a dynamic tradition of songwriting and performance. Paris, Montmartre and the cabarets artistiques influence the music of the world. The atmosphere from the Chat Noir, which had been operating since 1881, also reaches the Greek world. Music venues of this type, the famous “cafés chantants”, appeared in Athens but also in other urban centers of the Greek state. These French songs were exported to the Greek-speaking world either directly or indirectly, through other repertoire networks. In any case, the circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation. It should also be noted that, in various cases, often due to the great international success of the songs, the resulting network is extremely complex and does not only concern Greek-French relations. Finally, we have time and time again stumbled upon songs whose creators were born in a different place, worked in another, and, in the end, met in a third location and created a new work, often inspired by something pre-existing. Undoubtedly, cases of this type demonstrate the complexity regarding the issues of ownership of works, but also the problem of applying national signs to musical creations.

This recording is an adaptation of the French song "Prends mon coeur", set to music by composer and publisher Félix Marafioti (Varanodio, Italy, December 20, 1881 - Marseille, March 22, 1935) and lyrics by Jean Romani.

The French score was published in Marseilles, in 1927, by F. Marafioti. According to the abovementioned source, the song was introduced by Jane Bruyére at the Mondial.

Two recordings have been found so far in French discography:

- Germaine Lix, France, December 8, 1928 (Pathé Saphir 201445 - 3661 A)
- Gardoni (accordion), Puig (banjo), Baiz (flute), France, between August 1925 - September 1930 (Pathé Saphir 9712 B)

According to the findings so far, the song was recorded twice in Greek historical discography:

- "Par' tin kardia mou", Giorgos Savaris, Tzon Miliaris, Lousien [Loukianos Miliaris], probably in Milan, 1927 (Columbia UK 20228 - 8072), present recording
- "Pare oli tin kardia mou", Athinaiki Estudiantina (Athenian Estudiantina), probably in Athens, 1928 (Homocord G 832 - G 4-32049)

The Greek musical score of the song, with lyrics by Emilios Dragatsis and under the title "S' agapo, pare tin kardia mou", was published in Athens in 1927 by the Gaitanos - Konstantinidis - Starr publishing house.

The label of the record reads "Ekdotis Gaitanos" ("Publisher Gaitanos"), which perhaps testifies to the complex relations that arose between the previously powerful music publishing houses and record labels. It is probable that the publishing houses, which perhaps were among the few entities with recognized copyrights on musical works, would receive part of the recording rights in this new context of the recording industry.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[French lyrics: Romani Jean Greek lyrics: Dragatsis Aimilios]
Singer(s):
Savaris Giorgos, Miliaris Tzon, Lousien [Miliaris Loukianos]
Orchestra-Performers:
Orchestra
Orchestra director:
Lanzetta Ed.
Recording date:
1927
Recording location:
Milan (?)
Language(s):
Greek
Dance / Rhythm:
Blues
Publisher:
Columbia (UK)
Catalogue number:
8072
Matrix number:
20228
Duration:
2:28
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Col_8072_ParTinKardiaMou
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Par' tin kardia mou", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=9517

Related items

See also