Athanato romaiiko

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At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

This recording is probably comes from unidentified, so far, music revue. Richard Spottswood (1991: 1186) lists "Anastasiadis" as the lyricist and "Zakis" as the composer. According to the Discography of American Historical Recordings and the record label, the composer is Ierotheos Skizas. The song was recorded once again by Antonis Ntalgkas (Diamantidis) in May 1931 in Athens (His Master's Voice OW-168 – AO-2010).

In this recording, a musical theme popular in the Greek-speaking repertoire appears from 4 17 until the end of the recording as the final part. This tune it is met several times in the Greek discography, under titles such as "Vlachiko syrto", "Tha paro dyo", "Tha paro nio", "Mou proxenevoun dyo". This musical theme can also be found in the Jewish repertoire (for more see the recording of "Vlachiko syrto").

(Many thanks to Joel Rubin and Josh Horowitz for pointing out the connection of this recording with the Jewish ones)

Syncretism, which is observed in the musical actualizations of the areas where Greeks lived and recorded, mainly in the area of folk-popular traditions, is monumental. It only takes one to listen to historical discography, which begins in New York, Smyrna (Izmir), Constantinople (Istanbul), Athens and Thessaloniki since 1900. An essential part of this syncretism concerns the Jews, who constitute one of the main conduits in the uniquely diverse cultural heritage of the Greek-speaking world. They borrow and lend, but they also carry more distant traditions from the places where they have previously lived and the places they have traveled to. They are the central interlocutors in the Greek and Ottoman ecumene, together with Turkish-speaking Muslims, Orthodox but also Catholic Greek-speaking and Armenians, Levantine Protestants, Europeans and Americans, and compose a rich musical mosaic which consists of heterogeneous but co-existent palimpsests: a reservoir to which everyone contributes but from which also everyone receives.

The sources show the timeless existence of a Jewish element, at least since the Hellenistic period, in areas that millennia later formed the modern Greek state. After the “Edict of Milan” in 313 AD and the gradual Christianization of the Eastern Empire, the Jewish element found itself in a difficult position. The Jewish populations that have since been established in these lands became known as Romaniote Jews (or “Romaniotes”’ Rome – Romios). Their historical geographical center of reference was the city of Ioannina, and they speak Greek with various linguistic mixtures. After 1492 and the “Alhambra Decree” by the joint Spanish monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella, those Jews who did not accept to embrace Christianity were expelled from the Iberian peninsula. They became known as the Sepharadi Jews (or “Sepharadim”), one of the largest Jewish ethno-cultural categorizations (Sepharad in Jewish texts is referred to as the region of present-day Spain). Thessaloniki was one of the main destination points of this displacement, as the ties with the city were older and already close. Apart from the role played by the Greek Jews in the musical developments on the Greek peninsula, there were also important mutual influences between the Greek-speaking Orthodox and the Jews in various other areas where the two communities lived together. As, for example, in Odessa, with the Eastern Ashkenazi Jews, who mainly speak Yiddish, a sui generis Semitic-Slavic language (in Jewish texts, the Kingdom of Ashkenaz, a descendant of Noah, is connected with north-eastern European territories). Their orchestral repertoire is often called klezmer. In other words, apart from the geographical limits of the modern Greek state, the cultural conversations between the Greek Orthodox and the Jews also concern other parts of the world, both in Europe and America, where they met as immigrants.

Research and text: Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[Anastasiadis]
Singer(s):
Kyriakos Petros
Orchestra-Performers:
Mandolin, guitar
Recording date:
9/10/1929
Recording location:
New York
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Victor
Catalogue number:
V-58042-A
Matrix number:
CVE 55878
Duration:
4:39
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
12 in. (30 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Vi_58042_AthanatoRomeiko
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Athanato romaiiko", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=4206
Lyrics:
Βιολί, μπουζούκι, καφενές, ντέρτια, καημοί, μεράκια
γλυκός, παθιάρικος μανές, μαστίχες, καραφάκια

Να ζήσεις Αθηναίικο, Πολιτικό, Σμυρναίικο
ελκυστικό, αξέχαστο, αθάνατο Ρωμαίικο

Αμάν αμάν αμάν αμάν ώχου καλέ μου, καλέ μου, καλέ μου
ανάμεσα στον ουρανό, καλέ μου, θα βάλω τρία ξυράφια
αμάν, ξυράφια, ξυράφια, ρε και ξανά ξυράφια

— Κόλια μου, σ' έφαγε το κουνέλι! Δεν άκουγες τον αδερφό σου!

άχου
, για να περνάει, καλέ μου, η αγάπη μου να κόβει το λαιμό της
καλέ μου,
ταράτα ντουντούι ντάιντου νταντά

— Γεια σου, Κυριακό!

Σπηλιές, χασίσι, καπηλειά, ζωνάρι κόκκινο θηλιά
νυχτιές ατέλειωτες γλυκές, παραμυθένιες αγκαλιές

Να ζήσεις Αθηναίικο, Πολιτικό, Σμυρναίικο
ελκυστικό, αξέχαστο, αθάνατο Ρωμαίικο

Ώπα! Αχ, Βαγγελιστρίτσα μου, να χαράξει, να ιδώ τ' αηδόνια πως το λένε! Ώπα, ώπα, ω!

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

This recording is probably comes from unidentified, so far, music revue. Richard Spottswood (1991: 1186) lists "Anastasiadis" as the lyricist and "Zakis" as the composer. According to the Discography of American Historical Recordings and the record label, the composer is Ierotheos Skizas. The song was recorded once again by Antonis Ntalgkas (Diamantidis) in May 1931 in Athens (His Master's Voice OW-168 – AO-2010).

In this recording, a musical theme popular in the Greek-speaking repertoire appears from 4 17 until the end of the recording as the final part. This tune it is met several times in the Greek discography, under titles such as "Vlachiko syrto", "Tha paro dyo", "Tha paro nio", "Mou proxenevoun dyo". This musical theme can also be found in the Jewish repertoire (for more see the recording of "Vlachiko syrto").

(Many thanks to Joel Rubin and Josh Horowitz for pointing out the connection of this recording with the Jewish ones)

Syncretism, which is observed in the musical actualizations of the areas where Greeks lived and recorded, mainly in the area of folk-popular traditions, is monumental. It only takes one to listen to historical discography, which begins in New York, Smyrna (Izmir), Constantinople (Istanbul), Athens and Thessaloniki since 1900. An essential part of this syncretism concerns the Jews, who constitute one of the main conduits in the uniquely diverse cultural heritage of the Greek-speaking world. They borrow and lend, but they also carry more distant traditions from the places where they have previously lived and the places they have traveled to. They are the central interlocutors in the Greek and Ottoman ecumene, together with Turkish-speaking Muslims, Orthodox but also Catholic Greek-speaking and Armenians, Levantine Protestants, Europeans and Americans, and compose a rich musical mosaic which consists of heterogeneous but co-existent palimpsests: a reservoir to which everyone contributes but from which also everyone receives.

The sources show the timeless existence of a Jewish element, at least since the Hellenistic period, in areas that millennia later formed the modern Greek state. After the “Edict of Milan” in 313 AD and the gradual Christianization of the Eastern Empire, the Jewish element found itself in a difficult position. The Jewish populations that have since been established in these lands became known as Romaniote Jews (or “Romaniotes”’ Rome – Romios). Their historical geographical center of reference was the city of Ioannina, and they speak Greek with various linguistic mixtures. After 1492 and the “Alhambra Decree” by the joint Spanish monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella, those Jews who did not accept to embrace Christianity were expelled from the Iberian peninsula. They became known as the Sepharadi Jews (or “Sepharadim”), one of the largest Jewish ethno-cultural categorizations (Sepharad in Jewish texts is referred to as the region of present-day Spain). Thessaloniki was one of the main destination points of this displacement, as the ties with the city were older and already close. Apart from the role played by the Greek Jews in the musical developments on the Greek peninsula, there were also important mutual influences between the Greek-speaking Orthodox and the Jews in various other areas where the two communities lived together. As, for example, in Odessa, with the Eastern Ashkenazi Jews, who mainly speak Yiddish, a sui generis Semitic-Slavic language (in Jewish texts, the Kingdom of Ashkenaz, a descendant of Noah, is connected with north-eastern European territories). Their orchestral repertoire is often called klezmer. In other words, apart from the geographical limits of the modern Greek state, the cultural conversations between the Greek Orthodox and the Jews also concern other parts of the world, both in Europe and America, where they met as immigrants.

Research and text: Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[Anastasiadis]
Singer(s):
Kyriakos Petros
Orchestra-Performers:
Mandolin, guitar
Recording date:
9/10/1929
Recording location:
New York
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Victor
Catalogue number:
V-58042-A
Matrix number:
CVE 55878
Duration:
4:39
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
12 in. (30 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Vi_58042_AthanatoRomeiko
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Athanato romaiiko", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=4206
Lyrics:
Βιολί, μπουζούκι, καφενές, ντέρτια, καημοί, μεράκια
γλυκός, παθιάρικος μανές, μαστίχες, καραφάκια

Να ζήσεις Αθηναίικο, Πολιτικό, Σμυρναίικο
ελκυστικό, αξέχαστο, αθάνατο Ρωμαίικο

Αμάν αμάν αμάν αμάν ώχου καλέ μου, καλέ μου, καλέ μου
ανάμεσα στον ουρανό, καλέ μου, θα βάλω τρία ξυράφια
αμάν, ξυράφια, ξυράφια, ρε και ξανά ξυράφια

— Κόλια μου, σ' έφαγε το κουνέλι! Δεν άκουγες τον αδερφό σου!

άχου
, για να περνάει, καλέ μου, η αγάπη μου να κόβει το λαιμό της
καλέ μου,
ταράτα ντουντούι ντάιντου νταντά

— Γεια σου, Κυριακό!

Σπηλιές, χασίσι, καπηλειά, ζωνάρι κόκκινο θηλιά
νυχτιές ατέλειωτες γλυκές, παραμυθένιες αγκαλιές

Να ζήσεις Αθηναίικο, Πολιτικό, Σμυρναίικο
ελκυστικό, αξέχαστο, αθάνατο Ρωμαίικο

Ώπα! Αχ, Βαγγελιστρίτσα μου, να χαράξει, να ιδώ τ' αηδόνια πως το λένε! Ώπα, ώπα, ω!

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