Skarpinaki

Part of the content is temporarily available only in Greek

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

One of these fascinating networks concerns French songs, which were appropriated by Greek musicians, among others. The appropriation is twofold: on the one hand are the lyrics, which are now in Greek (often, in fact, they have nothing to do with the original ones), and, on the other hand, the performance practices: different instrumentation, different singing style, often differences in melodic and rhythmic forms and in the harmonies. Greek musicians adapt what they heard to their own condition, based on their own capabilities. The French ecumene lends its chansons, which carry a dynamic tradition of songwriting and performance. Paris, Montmartre and the cabarets artistiques influence the music of the world. The atmosphere from the Chat Noir, which had been operating since 1881, also reaches the Greek world. Music venues of this type, the famous “cafés chantants”, appeared in Athens but also in other urban centers of the Greek state. These French songs were exported to the Greek-speaking world either directly or indirectly, through other repertoire networks. In any case, the circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation.

In this recording, the appropriation concerns the couplet of the French song "Mariette" set to music by Alfred Baugé (dit Sterny) - Arthur Courquin and lyrics by Émile Rhein, which is also used as a couplet in the Greek song.

The musical score was published in Paris around 1910 by Courquin - Sterny (see also here). It was also included in the weekly illustrated issue of Paris qui chante (No 445), published in Paris on October 14, 1911.

The song was first introduced to the public in 1910 at the theater l'Eldorado by Montel and recorded several times in French historical discography. For example:


– “Mariette”, Alcide Terneuse, Paris, probably 1910 (Odeon A 78056)
– “Mariette”, Mr Elvell, Paris 1910-1911 (Aérophone 1030)
– “Mariette”, Charlus [Louis-Napoléon Defer], Paris 1911 (Pathé 60842-AR – 1090/2906)

The success would go beyond the borders of France and spread to many parts of Europe, as well as America and Russia. Recordings of the song, in several languages and in different formats, took place in Berlin, Milan, Moscow, New York, Madrid, London, Budapest, Warsaw, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico etc. For example:

– “Марiетта”, Orchestre du Palais de Dance of G. Vintilescu, Berlin, November 6, 1911 (Zonophone 690ak – X-2-60822)
– “Mariechen”, Gebrüder Wolf, Berlin, December 15, 1911 (Beka 13885)
– “Марiетта”, Орк. Александровск. Военнаго учил (Alexander Military Academy Orchestra), Moscow, around 1911 (RAOG 10008 – 10008)
– “Hoci a szádat”, Ilona Harmath, Βουδαπέστη 1911 (Lyrophon 47492 – 47492), from the operetta “Ártatlan Zsuzsi”
– “Marieta”, Solista de Casa Faulhaber, Rio de Janeiro, 23 January, 1912 (Favorite 6645-t-31-L – R 1-64079-Fa)
– “Маргарита" (Mariette), исп. орк. Л.-Гв. Коннаго полка (Cavalry Life Guards Regiment Band), Warsaw, between  May-August 1912 (Syrena Record 12382 – 12382)
 – “Marietta”, Regt. Band of H. N. Scots Guards, London, around 1912 (Columbia UK  27890 – 1860 και re-released by Regal UK G 6110 and Rosebud H 1226)
– “Marieta”, La Fornarina (Donna Consuelo), Madrid, November 9, 1912 (Gramophone 4521ab – 3-63102, Odeon A. 135334 & re-released by Victor 65791-A)
– “Mariette”, Victor Military Band, Camden, New Jersey, January 27, 1913 (Gramophone A12854 – 200027 & Victor 17281 & 97254)
 – “Marietta”, Ellery band, New York, May 22, 1913 (Columbia 38875-1 – A 1389)
– “Marietta”, Mary Durville, Milan, April 12, 1915 (Gramophone 19101b – 7-253015, Gramophone [Italy] R-6489 & Victor 69032)
– “Marieta”, Gioacchino Magni, New York, January 13, 1920 (Victor B-23626 – 72616-A)
– “Marieta”, Mariachi De Juan Güitrón, Mexico, late 1940s  (Peerless 5398-47 -2675)

According to the information collected so far, this recording is the only recording of the song in Greek historical discography.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
Unknown
Singer(s):
Savaris Giorgos, Miliaris Tzon, Lousien [Miliaris Loukianos]
Orchestra-Performers:
Piano (Ioannidis)
Orchestra director:
Ioannidis Sosos
Recording date:
1927
Recording location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Columbia (UK)
Catalogue number:
8044
Matrix number:
20082
Duration:
2:49
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Col_8044_Skarpinaki
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Skarpinaki", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=9505

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

One of these fascinating networks concerns French songs, which were appropriated by Greek musicians, among others. The appropriation is twofold: on the one hand are the lyrics, which are now in Greek (often, in fact, they have nothing to do with the original ones), and, on the other hand, the performance practices: different instrumentation, different singing style, often differences in melodic and rhythmic forms and in the harmonies. Greek musicians adapt what they heard to their own condition, based on their own capabilities. The French ecumene lends its chansons, which carry a dynamic tradition of songwriting and performance. Paris, Montmartre and the cabarets artistiques influence the music of the world. The atmosphere from the Chat Noir, which had been operating since 1881, also reaches the Greek world. Music venues of this type, the famous “cafés chantants”, appeared in Athens but also in other urban centers of the Greek state. These French songs were exported to the Greek-speaking world either directly or indirectly, through other repertoire networks. In any case, the circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours, but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation.

In this recording, the appropriation concerns the couplet of the French song "Mariette" set to music by Alfred Baugé (dit Sterny) - Arthur Courquin and lyrics by Émile Rhein, which is also used as a couplet in the Greek song.

The musical score was published in Paris around 1910 by Courquin - Sterny (see also here). It was also included in the weekly illustrated issue of Paris qui chante (No 445), published in Paris on October 14, 1911.

The song was first introduced to the public in 1910 at the theater l'Eldorado by Montel and recorded several times in French historical discography. For example:


– “Mariette”, Alcide Terneuse, Paris, probably 1910 (Odeon A 78056)
– “Mariette”, Mr Elvell, Paris 1910-1911 (Aérophone 1030)
– “Mariette”, Charlus [Louis-Napoléon Defer], Paris 1911 (Pathé 60842-AR – 1090/2906)

The success would go beyond the borders of France and spread to many parts of Europe, as well as America and Russia. Recordings of the song, in several languages and in different formats, took place in Berlin, Milan, Moscow, New York, Madrid, London, Budapest, Warsaw, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico etc. For example:

– “Марiетта”, Orchestre du Palais de Dance of G. Vintilescu, Berlin, November 6, 1911 (Zonophone 690ak – X-2-60822)
– “Mariechen”, Gebrüder Wolf, Berlin, December 15, 1911 (Beka 13885)
– “Марiетта”, Орк. Александровск. Военнаго учил (Alexander Military Academy Orchestra), Moscow, around 1911 (RAOG 10008 – 10008)
– “Hoci a szádat”, Ilona Harmath, Βουδαπέστη 1911 (Lyrophon 47492 – 47492), from the operetta “Ártatlan Zsuzsi”
– “Marieta”, Solista de Casa Faulhaber, Rio de Janeiro, 23 January, 1912 (Favorite 6645-t-31-L – R 1-64079-Fa)
– “Маргарита" (Mariette), исп. орк. Л.-Гв. Коннаго полка (Cavalry Life Guards Regiment Band), Warsaw, between  May-August 1912 (Syrena Record 12382 – 12382)
 – “Marietta”, Regt. Band of H. N. Scots Guards, London, around 1912 (Columbia UK  27890 – 1860 και re-released by Regal UK G 6110 and Rosebud H 1226)
– “Marieta”, La Fornarina (Donna Consuelo), Madrid, November 9, 1912 (Gramophone 4521ab – 3-63102, Odeon A. 135334 & re-released by Victor 65791-A)
– “Mariette”, Victor Military Band, Camden, New Jersey, January 27, 1913 (Gramophone A12854 – 200027 & Victor 17281 & 97254)
 – “Marietta”, Ellery band, New York, May 22, 1913 (Columbia 38875-1 – A 1389)
– “Marietta”, Mary Durville, Milan, April 12, 1915 (Gramophone 19101b – 7-253015, Gramophone [Italy] R-6489 & Victor 69032)
– “Marieta”, Gioacchino Magni, New York, January 13, 1920 (Victor B-23626 – 72616-A)
– “Marieta”, Mariachi De Juan Güitrón, Mexico, late 1940s  (Peerless 5398-47 -2675)

According to the information collected so far, this recording is the only recording of the song in Greek historical discography.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
Unknown
Singer(s):
Savaris Giorgos, Miliaris Tzon, Lousien [Miliaris Loukianos]
Orchestra-Performers:
Piano (Ioannidis)
Orchestra director:
Ioannidis Sosos
Recording date:
1927
Recording location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Columbia (UK)
Catalogue number:
8044
Matrix number:
20082
Duration:
2:49
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Col_8044_Skarpinaki
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Skarpinaki", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=9505

See also