Anoixiatiko aeraki (Eisodos Annis)

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At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The network in which the Greek-speaking urban popular song participates, constantly conversing with its co-tenants, is magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

Austria’s geographical position naturally renders the country the center of European developments, but also an important sort of conduit for the diffusion of tangible and intangible products from all and towards all directions. However, it is not a popular part of the relevant historiographical research as far as the relations between the Greek-speaking and the rest of the world. Not to mention that that within the musicological field, research is almost completely absent. However, geography often speaks for itself: The Habsburg Empire (Austro-Hungarian Empire after the Compromise of 1867) bordered the Ottoman Empire to the south. Both claimed territories of the later Yugoslavia, and especially those of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which, on the one hand, accommodated a notable Muslim population, and, on the other hand, communicated directly with the historical region of Macedonia and the Greek-speaking population that lived there. Vienna was a unique melting pot of cultures; the arts, dominated by music, were experiencing an unprecedented boom. A particular theatrical genre, which developed in various forms throughout Europe, was at the heart of Viennese creation: it was the Volkstheater (the “folk theater”), which was part of a long tradition of comical performing arts, with music playing a dominant role. According to the relevant discourse, after 1850 this style is transformed in the Viennese operetta, which had an unprecedented dynamic in terms of production of new works. Soon, discography would enter this network, and together with the already vibrant reality of the music publishing houses, would contribute to the mass diffusion of the Viennese operetta both in Europe and America. The leading element of these works was, among other things, the waltz, a trademark of the Austrian capital, as well as its main exported cultural product all over the world. The role played by the Strauss family was a catalyst in this development. These trends reached and were appropriated by the Greek-speaking world, which incorporated them into its own conditions. In any case, the circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours , but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation. It should also be noted that, in various cases, often due to the great international success of the songs, the resulting network is extremely complex and does not only concern Greek-Austrian relations.

As Dimitris Bikas points out, this recording comes from the operetta "Frühlingsluft", which premiered on May 9, 1903, at the Venedig summer theater in Vienna. More specifically, it is the song "Ich komm' direkt" (Entreelied der Hanni).

The music of the three-act operetta consists of works by Josef Strauss, mainly waltzes and dances, selected and arranged by Ernst Reiterer. This is how, thirty-three years after the death of the Austrian composer Josef Strauss, who had never dealt with this musical theater genre, his only operetta was created.

The German libretto written by Karl Lindau and Julius Wilhelm is based on the French Vaudeville "Coquin de Printemps" by Adolf Jaime and Georges Duval, first presented on June 13, 1888 at the Théâtre des Folies-Dramatiques, in Paris, to music by Paul Fauchey.

In 1903, the year the operetta was first presented to the public, the first recording of the song by the soprano Mizzi Zwerenz for the label Gramophone (251y - 043026), under the title "Frühlingsluft: Ich komm' direkt, Entreelied der Hanni, 1 Akt", took place in Vienna.

A year later, in 1904, Toni Malter-Main recorded it in Königsberg, Prussia, now Kaliningrad, Russia ("Frühlingsluft: Ich komm' direkt herein vom Land", Gramophone 1161 e - 43589), Annie Farner in Vienna ("Ich komm' direkt herein vom Land (Entrée der Hanni", Odeon 8171), and, once more, Mizzi Zwerenz for Odeon (Vienna, 34033 -X 34033).

In 1908, it was recorded in Berlin by Louise Obermaier ("Frühlingsluft: Ich kom' direkt herein", Gramophone 12697 u - X-23301 - 11068)

The operetta was presented in Greece under the title "Spring Breeze" from the "[Alexandros] Kyparissis - [Melpomeni] Kolyva" operetta on October 17, 1913 at the "theatro Kipou tou Lefkou Pyrgou" ("White Tower Garden Theater") in Thessaloniki (Konstantinidis, 2018: 158), by an Italian troupe, just for one performance in 1922, according to Manolis Seiragakis, from an Italian operetta at the Smyrna Theater, in Smyrna (Izmir), on April 8, 1922 (see Giavris, 2018: 74). According to unconfirmed information, it was also performed at the Olympia theater in Athens in 1911 (?).

As Antonis Chatziapostolou mentions (see 1949: 168), the singer Klotildi Trify(l)laki was of Armenian origin and her real name was Trifylak.

It was released by the record label Orfeon, for which Aristomenis Kalyviotis mentions the following (2002: 109-110): "Orfeon (Blumenthal Record and Talking Machine Co Ltd), owned by brothers Herman and Julius Blumenthal, began its recording production in late 1910 and early 1911 in Constantinople (Istanbul), where it also owned a record factory. The Blumenthal brothers, before opening Orfeon, were Odeon's representatives in Constantinople (Istanbul). On the labels of the company's records, the brand 'Orfeos Record' or the Greek 'Orfeion' appears many times instead of 'Orfeon Record'. Its repertoire included many Greek songs."

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Lyrics by:
[German libretto: Lindau Karl, Wilhelm Julius Greek translation: Unknown]
Singer(s):
Trifylaki [Klotildi]
Recording date:
1911 (?)
Recording location:
Constantinople (Istanbul)
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Orfeon
Catalogue number:
No-10220
Matrix number:
433
Duration:
2:59
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Orfeon_10220_AnoixiatikoAeraki_EisodosAnnis
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Anoixiatiko aeraki (Eisodos Annis)", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=5189

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The network in which the Greek-speaking urban popular song participates, constantly conversing with its co-tenants, is magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

Austria’s geographical position naturally renders the country the center of European developments, but also an important sort of conduit for the diffusion of tangible and intangible products from all and towards all directions. However, it is not a popular part of the relevant historiographical research as far as the relations between the Greek-speaking and the rest of the world. Not to mention that that within the musicological field, research is almost completely absent. However, geography often speaks for itself: The Habsburg Empire (Austro-Hungarian Empire after the Compromise of 1867) bordered the Ottoman Empire to the south. Both claimed territories of the later Yugoslavia, and especially those of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which, on the one hand, accommodated a notable Muslim population, and, on the other hand, communicated directly with the historical region of Macedonia and the Greek-speaking population that lived there. Vienna was a unique melting pot of cultures; the arts, dominated by music, were experiencing an unprecedented boom. A particular theatrical genre, which developed in various forms throughout Europe, was at the heart of Viennese creation: it was the Volkstheater (the “folk theater”), which was part of a long tradition of comical performing arts, with music playing a dominant role. According to the relevant discourse, after 1850 this style is transformed in the Viennese operetta, which had an unprecedented dynamic in terms of production of new works. Soon, discography would enter this network, and together with the already vibrant reality of the music publishing houses, would contribute to the mass diffusion of the Viennese operetta both in Europe and America. The leading element of these works was, among other things, the waltz, a trademark of the Austrian capital, as well as its main exported cultural product all over the world. The role played by the Strauss family was a catalyst in this development. These trends reached and were appropriated by the Greek-speaking world, which incorporated them into its own conditions. In any case, the circulation of musics is already a reality before the 20th century with theatrical and musical performances tours , but also with the networks of music publishing houses. Discography is not only embedded in this context, but also plays a key role in its transformation. It should also be noted that, in various cases, often due to the great international success of the songs, the resulting network is extremely complex and does not only concern Greek-Austrian relations.

As Dimitris Bikas points out, this recording comes from the operetta "Frühlingsluft", which premiered on May 9, 1903, at the Venedig summer theater in Vienna. More specifically, it is the song "Ich komm' direkt" (Entreelied der Hanni).

The music of the three-act operetta consists of works by Josef Strauss, mainly waltzes and dances, selected and arranged by Ernst Reiterer. This is how, thirty-three years after the death of the Austrian composer Josef Strauss, who had never dealt with this musical theater genre, his only operetta was created.

The German libretto written by Karl Lindau and Julius Wilhelm is based on the French Vaudeville "Coquin de Printemps" by Adolf Jaime and Georges Duval, first presented on June 13, 1888 at the Théâtre des Folies-Dramatiques, in Paris, to music by Paul Fauchey.

In 1903, the year the operetta was first presented to the public, the first recording of the song by the soprano Mizzi Zwerenz for the label Gramophone (251y - 043026), under the title "Frühlingsluft: Ich komm' direkt, Entreelied der Hanni, 1 Akt", took place in Vienna.

A year later, in 1904, Toni Malter-Main recorded it in Königsberg, Prussia, now Kaliningrad, Russia ("Frühlingsluft: Ich komm' direkt herein vom Land", Gramophone 1161 e - 43589), Annie Farner in Vienna ("Ich komm' direkt herein vom Land (Entrée der Hanni", Odeon 8171), and, once more, Mizzi Zwerenz for Odeon (Vienna, 34033 -X 34033).

In 1908, it was recorded in Berlin by Louise Obermaier ("Frühlingsluft: Ich kom' direkt herein", Gramophone 12697 u - X-23301 - 11068)

The operetta was presented in Greece under the title "Spring Breeze" from the "[Alexandros] Kyparissis - [Melpomeni] Kolyva" operetta on October 17, 1913 at the "theatro Kipou tou Lefkou Pyrgou" ("White Tower Garden Theater") in Thessaloniki (Konstantinidis, 2018: 158), by an Italian troupe, just for one performance in 1922, according to Manolis Seiragakis, from an Italian operetta at the Smyrna Theater, in Smyrna (Izmir), on April 8, 1922 (see Giavris, 2018: 74). According to unconfirmed information, it was also performed at the Olympia theater in Athens in 1911 (?).

As Antonis Chatziapostolou mentions (see 1949: 168), the singer Klotildi Trify(l)laki was of Armenian origin and her real name was Trifylak.

It was released by the record label Orfeon, for which Aristomenis Kalyviotis mentions the following (2002: 109-110): "Orfeon (Blumenthal Record and Talking Machine Co Ltd), owned by brothers Herman and Julius Blumenthal, began its recording production in late 1910 and early 1911 in Constantinople (Istanbul), where it also owned a record factory. The Blumenthal brothers, before opening Orfeon, were Odeon's representatives in Constantinople (Istanbul). On the labels of the company's records, the brand 'Orfeos Record' or the Greek 'Orfeion' appears many times instead of 'Orfeon Record'. Its repertoire included many Greek songs."

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Lyrics by:
[German libretto: Lindau Karl, Wilhelm Julius Greek translation: Unknown]
Singer(s):
Trifylaki [Klotildi]
Recording date:
1911 (?)
Recording location:
Constantinople (Istanbul)
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Orfeon
Catalogue number:
No-10220
Matrix number:
433
Duration:
2:59
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Orfeon_10220_AnoixiatikoAeraki_EisodosAnnis
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Anoixiatiko aeraki (Eisodos Annis)", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=5189

See also