Ninon, Nineta

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This is one of the many cases that underline the close relations between Naples and Smyrna (Izmir). "Ninon, Nineta" belongs to a corpus of recorded songs in which the Greek music protagonists borrowed music and/or lyrics from pre-existing Neapolitan songs. The Greek estudiantinas, which appeared in the first years of the 20th century, were the ones who played a leading role in these appropriations. After all, the mandolins, the guitars, the marches, polyphonic song and the bel canto singing style are characteristics that reveal the relations between the Canzone Napoletana and the Greek-speaking urban folk-popular song. Discography is a very important tool in the research and in the understanding of these relations.

The song "Ninon Nineta" was recorded in Constantinople (Istanbul) on March 1, 1909 for Gramophone, with the Elliniki Estudiantina (Greek Estudiantina). Sound engineers 
Fred Gaisberg and Hugh Murtagh were in charge of the recording.

In Greek historical discography another
two recordings has been found so far:

- Dnis Klotildi & Elliniki Estoudiantina, Smyrna 1909 (Gramophone 12873b - 4-13550)
- Antonis Melitsianos, Constantinople 1910-1911 (Grammavox 13000)

In the Greek musical score that was published, entitled "Ninon-Ninetta" (Ninon-Ninette in French), by the Christidis publishing house in Constantinople, the song is attributed (music and lyrics) to Χ. Χ. As written on the cover of the musical score, it was a hit by Vasilis Sideris’ Smyrnaiki Estudiantina (Smyrnaean Estudiantina). The fourth page of the musical score contains other lyrics, which were not included in this recording, in Greek and French.

As pointed out by Giorgos Konstantzos, Thomas Tamvakos and Athanasios Trikoupis (
2014: 150–151), Χ. Χ. was the nickname used by the composer Sotirios Grec.

The song is mentioned by Stella Epifaniou-Petraki in the book Laografika tis Smyrnis (Folklore from Smyrna) (volume E, pp. 83 and 80, respectively in the first and second edition) and in the paragraph of elafro (light) songs.

This is a Greek adaptation of the Neapolitan song "
'E spingole frangese", set to music by Enrico De Leva (1867 – 1955) and lyrics by Salvatore Di Giacomo (1860 – 1934). The song’s Neapolitan musical score was published in Milan in 1888 by the Ricordi publishing house. In the title of the publication we are informed that the song was presented at the "Piedigrotta" festival.

"Piedigrotta" refers to one of the most famous and oldest religious festivals that took place in Naples. During the festival, a music competition took place, which, in the 19th century, turned into a dynamic festival. This festival took the form of a commercial mechanism which played a key role in shaping and promoting Neapolitan song.

The Italian original version of the song seems to have been recorded several times, both on the phonograph and on 
cylinders.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and 
Nikos Ordoulidis

Lyrics by:
[Neapolitan lyrics: Salvatore Di Giacomo Greek lyrics: Ch. Ch. (Gkrek Sotirios) ?]
Singer(s):
Elliniki Estudiantina (Greek Estudiantina)
Orchestra-Performers:
Elliniki Estudiantina (Greek Estudiantina)
Recording date:
01/03/1909
Recording location:
Constantinople (Istanbul)
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Gramophone Concert Record
Catalogue number:
2-14333
Matrix number:
12305b
Duration:
3:25
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
GramoCR_2_14333_Ninon_Nineta
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Ninon, Nineta", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=5025

This is one of the many cases that underline the close relations between Naples and Smyrna (Izmir). "Ninon, Nineta" belongs to a corpus of recorded songs in which the Greek music protagonists borrowed music and/or lyrics from pre-existing Neapolitan songs. The Greek estudiantinas, which appeared in the first years of the 20th century, were the ones who played a leading role in these appropriations. After all, the mandolins, the guitars, the marches, polyphonic song and the bel canto singing style are characteristics that reveal the relations between the Canzone Napoletana and the Greek-speaking urban folk-popular song. Discography is a very important tool in the research and in the understanding of these relations.

The song "Ninon Nineta" was recorded in Constantinople (Istanbul) on March 1, 1909 for Gramophone, with the Elliniki Estudiantina (Greek Estudiantina). Sound engineers 
Fred Gaisberg and Hugh Murtagh were in charge of the recording.

In Greek historical discography another
two recordings has been found so far:

- Dnis Klotildi & Elliniki Estoudiantina, Smyrna 1909 (Gramophone 12873b - 4-13550)
- Antonis Melitsianos, Constantinople 1910-1911 (Grammavox 13000)

In the Greek musical score that was published, entitled "Ninon-Ninetta" (Ninon-Ninette in French), by the Christidis publishing house in Constantinople, the song is attributed (music and lyrics) to Χ. Χ. As written on the cover of the musical score, it was a hit by Vasilis Sideris’ Smyrnaiki Estudiantina (Smyrnaean Estudiantina). The fourth page of the musical score contains other lyrics, which were not included in this recording, in Greek and French.

As pointed out by Giorgos Konstantzos, Thomas Tamvakos and Athanasios Trikoupis (
2014: 150–151), Χ. Χ. was the nickname used by the composer Sotirios Grec.

The song is mentioned by Stella Epifaniou-Petraki in the book Laografika tis Smyrnis (Folklore from Smyrna) (volume E, pp. 83 and 80, respectively in the first and second edition) and in the paragraph of elafro (light) songs.

This is a Greek adaptation of the Neapolitan song "
'E spingole frangese", set to music by Enrico De Leva (1867 – 1955) and lyrics by Salvatore Di Giacomo (1860 – 1934). The song’s Neapolitan musical score was published in Milan in 1888 by the Ricordi publishing house. In the title of the publication we are informed that the song was presented at the "Piedigrotta" festival.

"Piedigrotta" refers to one of the most famous and oldest religious festivals that took place in Naples. During the festival, a music competition took place, which, in the 19th century, turned into a dynamic festival. This festival took the form of a commercial mechanism which played a key role in shaping and promoting Neapolitan song.

The Italian original version of the song seems to have been recorded several times, both on the phonograph and on 
cylinders.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and 
Nikos Ordoulidis

Lyrics by:
[Neapolitan lyrics: Salvatore Di Giacomo Greek lyrics: Ch. Ch. (Gkrek Sotirios) ?]
Singer(s):
Elliniki Estudiantina (Greek Estudiantina)
Orchestra-Performers:
Elliniki Estudiantina (Greek Estudiantina)
Recording date:
01/03/1909
Recording location:
Constantinople (Istanbul)
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
Gramophone Concert Record
Catalogue number:
2-14333
Matrix number:
12305b
Duration:
3:25
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
GramoCR_2_14333_Ninon_Nineta
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Ninon, Nineta", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=5025

See also