Mi rotas giati – Antio mikre mou

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At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

The inextricable relation between music and performing arts is more than vital. The cinema (as well as the theater too) traffics music on its own terms and plays a key role in diffusing it to places that are often far away. It also builds a special network that communicates with discography. Some of the songs written for the cinema are often the tip of the spear as regards the popularity of the films. One such case is this recording.

It includes an adaptation of the song "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier" set to music by Austrian composer and conductor Robert Stolz (Graz, Austro-Hungarian Empire, August 25, 1880 - Berlin, June 27, 1975) and lyrics by Walter Reisch (Vienna, Austro-Hungarian Empire, May 23, 1903 - Los Angeles, March 28, 1983), also an Austrian director, writer and lyricist. The Greek lyrics were written by Pol Menestrel (Giannis Chidiroglou).

According to some undocumented sources (see here), the song was first performed in the operetta "Die lustigen Weiber von Wien", with a libretto by Julius Brammer and Grünwald Alfred. The play premiered on November 7, 1908 at the Colosseum Theatre in Brno, in what is now the Czech Republic (see here) or, according to other sources (see here), on November 19, 1908 at the Colosseum in Vienna. The information, however, about "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier" is not confirmed by the song titles listed in the musical score of the operetta (see here).

In 1930, Stolz included the song in the German film "Das lied ist aus" (watch the film here), directed by Géza von Bolváry, produced by Super Film GmbH, with Willy Forst and Liane Haid in the leading roles. The film, which was also shot in a French-language version under the title "Petit officier... Adieu!" with the addition of French actor André Baugé, premiered in Berlin on October 7, 1930. In Greece, it was shown under the title "Mi rotas giati" (Don't ask why).

Both the film and the songs included in the soundtrack were a great success, which is reflected in historical discography with recordings in various languages and regions of the world, either in song or instrumental form. Three songs from the German film can be found in Greek-speaking discography. These are "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier" (the song on this recording), "Frag' nicht, warum ich gehe" (see "Mi rotas giati") and "Ja, wenn das Wörtchen „wenn“ nicht wär’" (see "Mi rotas giati – Ntountou - Ntountou").

The song "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier" was first recorded by film star Liane Haid and Lewis Ruth's orchestra in Berlin on September 11, 1930 (Gramophone CD9013 AF-488). Many recordings followed in various languages (French, English, Dutch, Hungarian, Spanish). For example:

– "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier", Richard Tauber – Odeon-Künstler-Orchester, Berlin, January 5, 1931 (Odeon Be 9321 – O-4983b)
– "Adieu vitéz kis gárdahadnagyom", Szedő Miklós – Dol Dauber zenekara, Vienna, January 9, 1931 (His Master's Voice 0L 27-2 – AM 3357 / 70-1834)
– "Adieu, mijn kleine gardeofficier", Kees Pruis, probably Berlin, 1931 (Homocord H-N. 66179)
– "Adieu, mijn lange grenadier", Louis David – Whooping Jazz Orchestra, London, May 28, 1931 (Gramophone 0B 940-1 – 30-6775, B4849)
– "Adieu, mon petit officier", J. J. Sterkens, Berlin, 1931 (Parlophon 81156 – B. 17112-I)
– "Goodbye (White horse inn)", Josef Locke, United Kingdom, 1947 (Columbia CA 20329 – D.B. 2336)
– "Adiós, mi lindo oficial, Mary Isaura – Orquesta Blue Star Jazz, Spain, around 1932 (Gramophone OJ337 – AE3882, Victor 30877)

The popularity of the song was also exploited in the musical theater, increasing its popularity even more. It was included in the French and English versions of the German operetta "Im weißen Rößl" (see here) which premiered on November 8, 1930 at the Große Schauspielhaus in Berlin. The music for the operetta was composed by Ralph Benatzky, with the addition of songs by Bruno Granichstaedten, Robert Gilbert and Robert Stolz, the libretto was written by Ralph Benatzky, Hans Müller-Einigen and Erik Charell, and the lyrics by Robert Gilbert. In England, the operetta was first performed at the Coliseum in London on April 8, 1931, under the title "The White Horse Inn" (see here), completing 651 performances. In France, it premiered at the Théâtre Mogador in Paris on October 1, 1932 under the title "L'Auberge du Cheval-Blanc" (see here). The presence of the song in the two operettas is also reflected in discography. On April 13, 1931, five days after the premiere of the operetta in England, Jack Hylton and his orchestra, with Pat O'Malley on vocals, made the recording of "From Erik Charell's White Horse inn: Foxtrot medley" (Gramophone 0G 591-1 – 30-6348, B6006, AE4321, GY301) in Paris, which includes the song in question under the title "Goodbye". As for French discography, Georges Milton, the chorus and orchestra of the Théâtre Mogador under the direction of M. Diot, nine days after the opening of the performances, that is, on October 10, 1932, recorded it in Paris under the title "Lu Auberge du Cheval Blanc - Opérette - Adieu... Adieu" (Columbia L 3922 – DF 992). On October 12, 1932, in the same city, Alibert recorded it too ("Adieu... Adieu", Pathé 203.656 - X. 91.038).

In Greek historical discography, in addition to the present recording, the song was released in three more covers:

– "Antio mikre mou axiomatike", Lysandros Ioannidis, Berlin, 1931 (Odeon GZA 2531 - Go 3014 - ZA 190848 b)
– "Antio mikre mou", Christos Solaris, Athens, April 9, 1931 (Columbia W.G. 136 – D.G. 104)
– "Antio mikre mou", Tetos Dimitriadis, Athens, May 23, 1931 (Victor 2W199 – V-58100)

Indicative of the popularity of the song, but also of the promotional methods of the record labels and the relations of the parent companies with their subsidiaries, was the release of the cover of the song by Willi Collo and the Columbia Tanz Orchester (Berlin, January 5, 1931, Columbia WR 83 - DW 2041, DV 386) and by Columbia Greece with three catalog numbers: D.G. 100, D.G. 102 and D.G. 103.

The Greek commercial musical score of the song was published in Athens, in 1930, by the Stefanos Gaitanos publishing house.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[Reisch Walter
Greek lyrics: Menestrel Pol (Chidiroglou Giannis)]
Singer(s):
Tambouras F.
Orchestra-Performers:
Orchestra
Recording date:
06/1931
Recording location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
His Master's Voice
Catalogue number:
AO-2000
Matrix number:
OW-285
Duration:
3:03
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
HMV_AO2000_AntioMikreMou
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Mi rotas giati – Antio mikre mou", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=10232

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

The inextricable relation between music and performing arts is more than vital. The cinema (as well as the theater too) traffics music on its own terms and plays a key role in diffusing it to places that are often far away. It also builds a special network that communicates with discography. Some of the songs written for the cinema are often the tip of the spear as regards the popularity of the films. One such case is this recording.

It includes an adaptation of the song "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier" set to music by Austrian composer and conductor Robert Stolz (Graz, Austro-Hungarian Empire, August 25, 1880 - Berlin, June 27, 1975) and lyrics by Walter Reisch (Vienna, Austro-Hungarian Empire, May 23, 1903 - Los Angeles, March 28, 1983), also an Austrian director, writer and lyricist. The Greek lyrics were written by Pol Menestrel (Giannis Chidiroglou).

According to some undocumented sources (see here), the song was first performed in the operetta "Die lustigen Weiber von Wien", with a libretto by Julius Brammer and Grünwald Alfred. The play premiered on November 7, 1908 at the Colosseum Theatre in Brno, in what is now the Czech Republic (see here) or, according to other sources (see here), on November 19, 1908 at the Colosseum in Vienna. The information, however, about "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier" is not confirmed by the song titles listed in the musical score of the operetta (see here).

In 1930, Stolz included the song in the German film "Das lied ist aus" (watch the film here), directed by Géza von Bolváry, produced by Super Film GmbH, with Willy Forst and Liane Haid in the leading roles. The film, which was also shot in a French-language version under the title "Petit officier... Adieu!" with the addition of French actor André Baugé, premiered in Berlin on October 7, 1930. In Greece, it was shown under the title "Mi rotas giati" (Don't ask why).

Both the film and the songs included in the soundtrack were a great success, which is reflected in historical discography with recordings in various languages and regions of the world, either in song or instrumental form. Three songs from the German film can be found in Greek-speaking discography. These are "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier" (the song on this recording), "Frag' nicht, warum ich gehe" (see "Mi rotas giati") and "Ja, wenn das Wörtchen „wenn“ nicht wär’" (see "Mi rotas giati – Ntountou - Ntountou").

The song "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier" was first recorded by film star Liane Haid and Lewis Ruth's orchestra in Berlin on September 11, 1930 (Gramophone CD9013 AF-488). Many recordings followed in various languages (French, English, Dutch, Hungarian, Spanish). For example:

– "Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier", Richard Tauber – Odeon-Künstler-Orchester, Berlin, January 5, 1931 (Odeon Be 9321 – O-4983b)
– "Adieu vitéz kis gárdahadnagyom", Szedő Miklós – Dol Dauber zenekara, Vienna, January 9, 1931 (His Master's Voice 0L 27-2 – AM 3357 / 70-1834)
– "Adieu, mijn kleine gardeofficier", Kees Pruis, probably Berlin, 1931 (Homocord H-N. 66179)
– "Adieu, mijn lange grenadier", Louis David – Whooping Jazz Orchestra, London, May 28, 1931 (Gramophone 0B 940-1 – 30-6775, B4849)
– "Adieu, mon petit officier", J. J. Sterkens, Berlin, 1931 (Parlophon 81156 – B. 17112-I)
– "Goodbye (White horse inn)", Josef Locke, United Kingdom, 1947 (Columbia CA 20329 – D.B. 2336)
– "Adiós, mi lindo oficial, Mary Isaura – Orquesta Blue Star Jazz, Spain, around 1932 (Gramophone OJ337 – AE3882, Victor 30877)

The popularity of the song was also exploited in the musical theater, increasing its popularity even more. It was included in the French and English versions of the German operetta "Im weißen Rößl" (see here) which premiered on November 8, 1930 at the Große Schauspielhaus in Berlin. The music for the operetta was composed by Ralph Benatzky, with the addition of songs by Bruno Granichstaedten, Robert Gilbert and Robert Stolz, the libretto was written by Ralph Benatzky, Hans Müller-Einigen and Erik Charell, and the lyrics by Robert Gilbert. In England, the operetta was first performed at the Coliseum in London on April 8, 1931, under the title "The White Horse Inn" (see here), completing 651 performances. In France, it premiered at the Théâtre Mogador in Paris on October 1, 1932 under the title "L'Auberge du Cheval-Blanc" (see here). The presence of the song in the two operettas is also reflected in discography. On April 13, 1931, five days after the premiere of the operetta in England, Jack Hylton and his orchestra, with Pat O'Malley on vocals, made the recording of "From Erik Charell's White Horse inn: Foxtrot medley" (Gramophone 0G 591-1 – 30-6348, B6006, AE4321, GY301) in Paris, which includes the song in question under the title "Goodbye". As for French discography, Georges Milton, the chorus and orchestra of the Théâtre Mogador under the direction of M. Diot, nine days after the opening of the performances, that is, on October 10, 1932, recorded it in Paris under the title "Lu Auberge du Cheval Blanc - Opérette - Adieu... Adieu" (Columbia L 3922 – DF 992). On October 12, 1932, in the same city, Alibert recorded it too ("Adieu... Adieu", Pathé 203.656 - X. 91.038).

In Greek historical discography, in addition to the present recording, the song was released in three more covers:

– "Antio mikre mou axiomatike", Lysandros Ioannidis, Berlin, 1931 (Odeon GZA 2531 - Go 3014 - ZA 190848 b)
– "Antio mikre mou", Christos Solaris, Athens, April 9, 1931 (Columbia W.G. 136 – D.G. 104)
– "Antio mikre mou", Tetos Dimitriadis, Athens, May 23, 1931 (Victor 2W199 – V-58100)

Indicative of the popularity of the song, but also of the promotional methods of the record labels and the relations of the parent companies with their subsidiaries, was the release of the cover of the song by Willi Collo and the Columbia Tanz Orchester (Berlin, January 5, 1931, Columbia WR 83 - DW 2041, DV 386) and by Columbia Greece with three catalog numbers: D.G. 100, D.G. 102 and D.G. 103.

The Greek commercial musical score of the song was published in Athens, in 1930, by the Stefanos Gaitanos publishing house.

Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
[Reisch Walter
Greek lyrics: Menestrel Pol (Chidiroglou Giannis)]
Singer(s):
Tambouras F.
Orchestra-Performers:
Orchestra
Recording date:
06/1931
Recording location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Publisher:
His Master's Voice
Catalogue number:
AO-2000
Matrix number:
OW-285
Duration:
3:03
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
HMV_AO2000_AntioMikreMou
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Mi rotas giati – Antio mikre mou", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=10232

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