Trava re alani

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At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

Naturally, in the large urban centers of the Ottoman Empire around the Mediterranean Sea, the “conversations” of the Greek-speakers with their Turkish-speaking Muslim “co-tenants”, the Catholic Greek-speakers, the Armenians, the Sepharadi and Ashkenazi Jews, the Levantine Protestants, and the Europeans and the Americans, were more than intense. Very often, the scope of this network extends to the Balkans, to Eastern and even to a part of Central Europe. Especially regarding relations between Orthodox and Muslims, the relevant evidence demonstrates the musical exchanges between them and elucidate an ecumene where everyone contributed to the great musical “melting-pot”, and where everyone may draw from it, as well as redeposit it, in a new form, with a reformulated text and its meaning, with sometimes clear and sometimes blurred references to its pre-text, until someone else pulls it out again, through the “melting-pot”, so that it becomes clear that there is no end in this recreational and dynamic process where fluidity prevails.
 A case that comes from such repertoires the song “Trava vre alani”.

In addition to this recording (a re-release in Turkey from  His Master's Voice's record ΟΤ 1357-1 – AO 2147, Athens, 1936), the song, one of the most popular of Kostas Skarvelis, was recorded in Athens in 1934 in two more covers in the Greek historical discography:

– By Roza Eskenazy under the title "Trava re alani" (His Master's Voice ΟΤ 1357-1 – AO 2147 and re-released by Sahibini Sesi AO 2147)
– By Kostas Roukounas under the title "Trava vre magka kai alani" (Odeon Go 2139 – GA 1793 and re-released in USA by Decca 31004-A).

Finally, in 1968, in Athens, Markos Vamvakaris recorded the song under the title "Min peraseis apo tin geitonia mou" on a 45 rpm record (RCA Victor 076004-B).

The song, however, can also be found in the Turkish-speaking repertoire. Around 1936 Fahire Hanim recorded in Istanbul the song "Çek Paşalimanı’na" (Columbia 17302).

Almost eighty years later, in 2015, the Turkish band Ahmet Beyler released the CD "Hayad Nerde" (Pasaj). The record includes an adaptation of the song "Git Haylazim", in which the tune in question is combined with the musical theme of the orchestral piece "Zorba's Dance", composed by Mikis Theodorakis for the 1964 film "Zorba the Greek".


Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
Skarvelis Kostas
Singer(s):
Eskenazy Roza
Orchestra-Performers:
Popular orchestra
Recording date:
1934
Recording location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Dance / Rhythm:
Chasapikos
Publisher:
Sahibinin Sesi
Catalogue number:
AO-2147
Matrix number:
OT-1735
Duration:
3:15
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Sahib_AO2147_TravaReAlani
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Trava re alani", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=10575
Lyrics:
Μην περάσεις απ’ τη γειτονιά μου
μάγκα, μη σε ξαναϊδώ μπροστά μου
έμαθα μες στο Πασαλιμάνι
π’ αγαπάς μια μόρτισσα, βρ’ αλάνη

Τράβα, βρε μάγκα και αλάνη
τράβα για το Πασαλιμάνι

Απ’ τη μόρτισσα γλυκά φιλάκια
κάθε βράδυ γλέντι και χαδάκια
κι έτσι την περνάς μαζί της φίνα
και ξεχνάς ν’ ανέβεις στην Αθήνα

Τράβα, βρε μάγκα και αλάνη
τράβα για το Πασαλιμάνι

Και έτσι πια, βρε μάγκα, για να ξέρεις
μ’ έχασες για πάντα για να μ’ εύρεις
κάθε βράδυ μες στο Καλαμάκι
θα γλεντώ με ένα χασαπάκι

Τράβα, βρε μάγκα και αλάνη
τράβα για το Πασαλιμάνι

— Άντε, να μας ζήσει το Πασαλιμάνι!

At the beginning of the 20th century, Europe is living in peace and prosperity. The “Belle Époque” is an outgrowth of previous important historical events and developments. The networks that are created and which evolve funnel both people and their products, tangible and intangible. It is within this multi-layered world that sound recording and sound reproduction is invented. Early record labels send mobile crews literally all over the world to record local musicians. The range of the repertoire is endless. Cosmopolitanism in large urban centers favors polystylisms and polymorphisms. Colonialism, revolutions, conflicts, refugee flows; the theater, cinema, radio, photography, orchestras’ tours, but also circulations in all kinds of commercial channels in a world that evolves dynamically and anisotropically, form a complex network of “centers” and “peripheries” in alternating roles setting musical idioms in motion, both literally and figuratively. The networks in which the Greek-speaking musics participate, constantly conversing with their co-tenants, are magnificent. Discography has already provided important tools in understanding the relationships that developed between “national” repertoires. The result of this ongoing research is “Cosmopolitanism in Greek Historical Discography”.

Naturally, in the large urban centers of the Ottoman Empire around the Mediterranean Sea, the “conversations” of the Greek-speakers with their Turkish-speaking Muslim “co-tenants”, the Catholic Greek-speakers, the Armenians, the Sepharadi and Ashkenazi Jews, the Levantine Protestants, and the Europeans and the Americans, were more than intense. Very often, the scope of this network extends to the Balkans, to Eastern and even to a part of Central Europe. Especially regarding relations between Orthodox and Muslims, the relevant evidence demonstrates the musical exchanges between them and elucidate an ecumene where everyone contributed to the great musical “melting-pot”, and where everyone may draw from it, as well as redeposit it, in a new form, with a reformulated text and its meaning, with sometimes clear and sometimes blurred references to its pre-text, until someone else pulls it out again, through the “melting-pot”, so that it becomes clear that there is no end in this recreational and dynamic process where fluidity prevails.
 A case that comes from such repertoires the song “Trava vre alani”.

In addition to this recording (a re-release in Turkey from  His Master's Voice's record ΟΤ 1357-1 – AO 2147, Athens, 1936), the song, one of the most popular of Kostas Skarvelis, was recorded in Athens in 1934 in two more covers in the Greek historical discography:

– By Roza Eskenazy under the title "Trava re alani" (His Master's Voice ΟΤ 1357-1 – AO 2147 and re-released by Sahibini Sesi AO 2147)
– By Kostas Roukounas under the title "Trava vre magka kai alani" (Odeon Go 2139 – GA 1793 and re-released in USA by Decca 31004-A).

Finally, in 1968, in Athens, Markos Vamvakaris recorded the song under the title "Min peraseis apo tin geitonia mou" on a 45 rpm record (RCA Victor 076004-B).

The song, however, can also be found in the Turkish-speaking repertoire. Around 1936 Fahire Hanim recorded in Istanbul the song "Çek Paşalimanı’na" (Columbia 17302).

Almost eighty years later, in 2015, the Turkish band Ahmet Beyler released the CD "Hayad Nerde" (Pasaj). The record includes an adaptation of the song "Git Haylazim", in which the tune in question is combined with the musical theme of the orchestral piece "Zorba's Dance", composed by Mikis Theodorakis for the 1964 film "Zorba the Greek".


Research and text: Leonardos Kounadis and Nikos Ordoulidis

Author (Composer):
Lyrics by:
Skarvelis Kostas
Singer(s):
Eskenazy Roza
Orchestra-Performers:
Popular orchestra
Recording date:
1934
Recording location:
Athens
Language(s):
Greek
Dance / Rhythm:
Chasapikos
Publisher:
Sahibinin Sesi
Catalogue number:
AO-2147
Matrix number:
OT-1735
Duration:
3:15
Item location:
Kounadis Archive Record Library
Physical description:
10 in. (25 cm)
Source:
Kounadis Archive
ID:
Sahib_AO2147_TravaReAlani
Licensing:
cc
Reference link:
Kounadis Archive, "Trava re alani", 2019, https://vmrebetiko.gr/en/item-en?id=10575
Lyrics:
Μην περάσεις απ’ τη γειτονιά μου
μάγκα, μη σε ξαναϊδώ μπροστά μου
έμαθα μες στο Πασαλιμάνι
π’ αγαπάς μια μόρτισσα, βρ’ αλάνη

Τράβα, βρε μάγκα και αλάνη
τράβα για το Πασαλιμάνι

Απ’ τη μόρτισσα γλυκά φιλάκια
κάθε βράδυ γλέντι και χαδάκια
κι έτσι την περνάς μαζί της φίνα
και ξεχνάς ν’ ανέβεις στην Αθήνα

Τράβα, βρε μάγκα και αλάνη
τράβα για το Πασαλιμάνι

Και έτσι πια, βρε μάγκα, για να ξέρεις
μ’ έχασες για πάντα για να μ’ εύρεις
κάθε βράδυ μες στο Καλαμάκι
θα γλεντώ με ένα χασαπάκι

Τράβα, βρε μάγκα και αλάνη
τράβα για το Πασαλιμάνι

— Άντε, να μας ζήσει το Πασαλιμάνι!

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